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Anchored by Jake Tapper, The Lead airs at 4 p.m. ET on CNN.

Anchored by Jake Tapper, The Lead airs at 4 p.m. ET on CNN.

On the Next Episode of The Lead

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national lead

August 22nd, 2014
05:38 PM ET

Church prepares for Michael Brown funeral

(CNN) – The Friendly Temple Missionary Baptist Church in Ferguson, Missouri, is preparing for a very big day. Come Monday, the seats will be full of mourners to remember Michael Brown.

The church's special events manager Denise Makey is busy preparing for the largest event the congregation has ever seen, making room for more than 5,000 people.

"It's attracting a lot of attention, but at the end of the day, these parents are burying their son. And at the end of the day, that changes your perspective. They need to mourn their son and remember him, and our job is to support them and be there for them," Makey said.
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national lead

May 22nd, 2013
06:02 PM ET

Tornado destroyed businesses, spared owners

One look at the Camden Village strip mall, in Moore, Oklahoma, and you see not only the tornado's fury, but also its vagaries. At one end, a Chinese restaurant was torn to shreds, at the other, a pub was left virtually untouched.

"The tornado just came, I mean you can see the way it came. Dan McGuiness, which is the pub at the end, you could go in there and have a hamburger if they had electricity," said Lisa Talley, whose father owns the mall. "They didn't get touched. There were two beers still sitting on the counter, untouched."
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national lead

April 23rd, 2013
06:49 PM ET

Neighbor photographs Boston bombing suspects' shootout with police

One of the biggest mysteries in the Boston Marathon bombing investigation is what exactly happened when police first caught up with the suspects late Thursday night when a gun battle broke out on Laurel Street, in Watertown, Massachusetts. For Tamerlan Tsarnaev, it would be his final stand; the 26-year-old died later that night.

New images are filling in some of the blanks thanks to a neighbor who suddenly found his home in the line of fire.

When Andrew Kitzenberg's normally tranquil street erupted, the 26-year-old began taking pictures and live tweeting the gun battle as the Tsarnaev brothers were allegedly pinned down by police.

"I could see the two shooters behind the SUV shooting on, down Laurel Street," said Kitzenberg, who immediately ran upstairs to his bedroom on the third floor, jumped on his bed, laid on his stomach, and tried to stay below the window.

"I got my camera right up against the window and the glass, continuing to take photos of the shooters and what was happening right in front of my bedroom window," Kitzenberg said.
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Boston bombing suspect attended classes, parties in days after the attack

national lead

April 20th, 2013
11:48 AM ET

Boston bombing suspect attended classes, parties in days after the attack

Boston (CNN) - Boston Marathon bombings suspect Dzhokar Tsarnaev, 19, appeared on the campus of University of Massachusetts Dartmouth every day after the attack until late Thursday, a university official told CNN. Tsarnaev attended classes as well as parties in the dorms during that period.

Tsarnaev is registered as a student at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, reportedly majoring in marine biology. The university ordered its campus evacuated on Friday. The school is located 65 miles south of Cambridge, just west of New Bedford.

The 19-year-old suspect was taken into taken into custody Friday night, bringing to an end a massive manhunt in Boston. An earlier shootout with police left his older brother Tamerlan Tsarnaev - the other man wanted in the bombings - dead.

The younger Tsarnaev is in serious condition, Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said at a news conference. He is being treated at Boston's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, hospital spokeswoman Kelly Lawman said.

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national lead

April 16th, 2013
06:29 PM ET

Boston Marathon bombings: The day after

By Jake Tapper and Katie Hinman

Boston (CNN) - The streets are full of marathoners, easy to spot in their yellow and blue. But instead of celebrating their victories, they are wandering the city, unsure of what to do next.

"This is the stuff that happens in Bosnia or Syria. Not the United States," one woman told us.

Boston is a city on edge, like a war zone. The people we found were trying to pick up where yesterday so violently ended. The medals and the possessions of those who didn't finish the race, lined up like sad soldiers.

On one street, empty cups that once contained water for runners litter the roads, left as an ephemeral memorial to the panic felt after the twin blasts. Some of the witnesses came back with their children, one tackling the horrific situation with her kids, telling them that they are safe, and that there are lots of helpers making the city safe.

"Bad things like this happen, but there's many, many other people out there who are - who are making it right," she said.
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