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Anchored by Jake Tapper, The Lead airs at 4 p.m. ET on CNN.

Anchored by Jake Tapper, The Lead airs at 4 p.m. ET on CNN.

On the Next Episode of The Lead

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world lead

March 24th, 2014
05:20 PM ET

How do authorities know where Flight 370 ended? Math was key

(CNN) – Hope has run out in the search for survivors of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, but the devastating news Monday at least offers a new level of certainty about where to look for the aircraft.

Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 went down in the southern Indian Ocean, Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak said Monday, citing a new analysis of satellite data by a British satellite company and accident investigators, and what he called "a type of analysis never before used in an investigation."

CNN's Tom Foreman walks us through the data, and the conclusion it points to.

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March 24th, 2014
04:42 PM ET

Working backwards to find Flight 370

(CNN) – Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 went down in the southern Indian Ocean, Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak said Monday, citing a new analysis of satellite data by a British satellite company and accident investigators.

While investigators have yet to find even a piece of the plane, the Prime Minister based his announcement on what he described as unprecedented analysis of satellite data by British satellite provider Inmarsat and the British Air Accidents Investigation Branch.

CEO of the United States Geospatial Intelligence Foundation Keith Masback joins CNN's "The Lead with Jake Tapper" to discuss that data, and how this technology works.

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March 24th, 2014
04:25 PM ET

Flight 370 passenger's relative: 'All lives are lost'

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (CNN) - Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 went down in the southern Indian Ocean, Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak said Monday, citing a new analysis of satellite data by a British satellite company and accident investigators.

A relative of a missing passenger briefed by the airline in Beijing said, "They have told us all lives are lost."

While the announcement appeared to end hopes of finding survivors more than two weeks after the flight vanished, it left many key questions unanswered, including what went wrong aboard the Beijing-bound airliner and the location of its wreckage in the deep, wild waters of the Indian Ocean.

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March 24th, 2014
02:18 PM ET

Brother of missing passenger: We need conclusive evidence

(CNN) – Families of missing Flight 370 passengers, some of whom had held out hope their relatives somehow were still alive, received devastating news Monday, when Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak announced Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 went down in the southern Indian Ocean, citing a new analysis of satellite data by a British satellite company and accident investigators.

A relative of a missing passenger briefed by the airline in Beijing said, "They have told us all lives are lost."

Captain Bimal Sharma, whose sister Chandrika is on board the missing plane, says he hopes investigators will continue the search. He tells CNN's "The Lead with Jake Tapper" he needs to see debris from the aircraft, and the flight-data and cockpit-voice recorders "to know what exactly happened, because there are too many unanswered questions."

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