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Anchored by Jake Tapper, The Lead airs at 4 p.m. ET on CNN.

Anchored by Jake Tapper, The Lead airs at 4 p.m. ET on CNN.

On the Next Episode of The Lead

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national lead

April 24th, 2013
07:13 PM ET

Boylston Street reopens with heavy hearts

Boston (CNN) - Copley Square turned from a crime scene back into the heart of Boston on Thursday. The blood has been washed off the streets, but the wound is still fresh. Bostonians gathered at a makeshift memorial to remember those taken from us by last week's horrific, senseless acts of terrorism.

Everywhere you looked, the names of the four victims appeared: Officer Sean Collier, Krystle Campbell, Lu Lingzi, and little Martin Richard.

"It's sad, but it feels good," said Alicia Capovico, who works down the street. She and her colleagues were back at work for the first time Thursday, and came to the square with flowers to pay their respects.

"When we came to work we all hugged each other, which we normally would never do," Capovico said.
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April 24th, 2013
07:03 PM ET

Boston bombings is business and personal for one ICE official

For one Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) official, the investigation into the bombings is not just business, it's personal. Richard Coleman was standing with friends at the finish line when the bombs went off, and told his story for the first time to CNN.

Coleman said he was outside a restaurant, and was knocked to the ground after the second bomb. He got up and rushed into the restaurant looking for friends, and began helping victims in the aftermath of the attack.

Coleman was wearing a work jacket, one that had the words police on it, and people looked to him for guidance. He started shepherded people to the back of the restaurant, and it was when he was standing there that people around him noticed something was amiss.

"Five or ten people walked by and gave me a once over with a wide-eyed look," said Coleman. Finally, one woman walked by and told Coleman he was bleeding death.

"I looked down and I was standing in about a 2-foot circumference pool of my own blood," said Coleman. "A piece of the bomb had gone into my foot ... and had severed the artery in my leg."
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April 24th, 2013
06:50 PM ET

Compensating Boston bombing victims will be an 'excruciating challenge'

Americans from across the country have already donated more than $21 million to help the Boston Marathon bombing victims. Lawyer Kenneth Feinberg was appointed as the administrator of "The One Fund Boston", and is tasked with distributing it fairly.

"It's an excruciating challenge," said Feinberg.

Feinberg was also the administrator for victims and compensation funds for 9/11, the BP oil spill, and the Virginia Tech and Aurora, Colorado shootings. An important part of the process, he said, is meeting the victims.

"When you meet with individual families, in confidence, private meetings, it's very emotional. 'Mr. Feinberg, keep the money. I don't want the money. Bring my son back, bring my wife back, bring my husband back.' 'I can't do that,' you explain," said Feinberg. What he can do, said Feinberg, is provide some financial help that may help victims move forward as best as they can.
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April 24th, 2013
06:22 PM ET

Aurora tragedy helped Boston victims

Since 9/11, hospitals around the country have prepared themselves for worst case scenarios to come rushing through their ER doors. But for Dr. Ron Walls, chair of the department of emergency medicine at Brigham and Women's University in Boston, the lessons that prepared him for the Boston bombing were much more recent.

"Ideally we work where we have one patient come in, as a trauma patient, we have a really highly-trained team around them that works beautifully together and takes care of that one patient," said Walls. "But what happens when you multiply that by 20? And one of the clarion calls for us was the Aurora shootings," said Walls.

In Aurora, one hospital received nearly two dozen patients in one hour. That's a very unusual circumstance, said Walls.

"It made us wonder, could we do that? So we started looking more specifically at how do we handle an unexpectedly large number of patients in a short amount of time," said Walls. "We always had that, and we'd tested it. But what Aurora did for us was crystallized a specific question, and that question was, 'Could we take 23 critical patients in one hour?' And we had never answered that."

Until last Monday, when they answered almost to the letter.
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April 24th, 2013
05:39 PM ET

Sources: Boston suspect was in U.S. databases

There was so much talk about stopping miscommunication among U.S. agencies after 9/11. Now, law enforcement and national security sources tell CNN that Boston bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev was on two different terror databases. Those sources say he was not on a no-fly list, but there was a flag in one of those databases to ping authorities if he tried to leave the country.

Apparently, the system did ping when he went to Russia last year. But the flag in the system expired while he was over there, and there was no ping upon his return.

The issue now, says CNN security analyst and former DHS official Julette Kayyem, is that there is so much information coming in through so many different agencies.

There are probably about a dozen databases, says Kayyem, and only one of them is very serious, the Terrorist Watchlist.

"All of these different databases have different standards," said Kayyem. "One of the fixes ... after this and all the evidence comes in, would be is there a way to make sure the information on them is based on the same standards."
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